Goodbye Farewell (Larry Norman song) with Lyrics and Chords

From our Numubu webcast

on 26th April 2014: our cover of Larry Norman’s beautiful song “Goodbye Farewell”

Samuel is playing our Tanglewood TW15CE-B  guitar and I’m on my old Mugen “the ’78”

DC and Samuel on webcast

Still from the video

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This is taken at a bit of a clip, I think! But you can hear the songs at a more stately pace in this old video of me performing it a few years ago:

LYRICS & CHORDS
(written by Larry Norman)

Goodbye, farewell, we’ll meet again (D, Bm, F#m,)
Somewhere beyond the sky. (D, Bm, F#m, A7)
I pray that you will stay with God (G, Em, D, Bm)
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye. (D, A7, D-G, D-G)

The light grows dim but in this hour (D, Bm, F#m,)
I have no tears to cry. (D, Bm, F#m, A7)
My heart is full, my joy complete. (G, Em, D, Bm)
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye. (D, A7, D-G, D-G)

I feel no loss of hope as I’ve grown older. (Bm, G, D)
Only this world’s weight upon my shoulder. (Bm, E7, Em7, A7)

My heart beats to a slower song, (D, Bm, F#m,)
So softly in my veins. (D, Bm, F#m, A7)
The night is warm, but in my sleep (G, Em, D, Bm)
I dream of heaven’s reign. (D, A7, D-G, D-G)

Everything I am I’ve tried to show you, (Bm, G, D)
In this life I’ve been so blessed to know you. (Bm, E7, Em7, A7)

Goodbye, farewell, we’ll meet again (D, Bm, F#m,)
Somewhere beyond the sky. (D, Bm, F#m, A7)
I pray that you will walk with God (G, G#dim, F#m, Bm)
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye. (Em, A7, Bm, E7)
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye. (Em, A7, D)

For my original music videos go to http://www.youtube.com/DCCardwellsMusic

More covers at http://www.youtube.com/dccardwellcovers

Thanks for listening! ~ DC

Django loves Juno. But does Juno love Django? (Don’t miss the cat-fight in slo-mo!)

Django just wants to hug Juno. He even snuck a kiss this morning! But watch what happens next…

Black cat Juno is a clever eight-year-old cat, thoughtful and generally gentle and very cool (but sometimes a little nervous). She has lived with us for a year and a half.

Django is a two-year-old ginger cat whom we adopted from the RSPCA a couple of months ago. As they described him to us, he’s a “total smooch”, who kisses and hugs and licks everyone and everything.

Django adores Juno and makes the most incredible sound when she’s in the room, or occasionally when he’s just thinking about her and wondering where she is. They’re impossible to describe, but I’ll try and get a good recording of them and post it here soon.

However, Juno hisses and whacks Django if he comes within about a foot and a half (45 cm) of her.

Still, though, she misses him when he’s not around and she seeks him out as often as she tries to get away from him. But she likes to keep her distance.

Django is the most playful adult cat we’ve ever met. He still behaves like a kitten, climbing and running and play-fighting and generally being hyperactive, until the afternoon, when he sleeps on the couch for a few hours. He tries to get as close to Juno as he can and we’re pretty sure he just wants to hug and kiss her like crazy. He’s irrepressible and will gradually edge up, to her, almost imperceptibly in small degrees. He might roll over or stretch every now and then, just casually, but every time getting an inch closer to her. And, in between, he’ll just sit and gaze upon her adoringly. She looks the other way, or else gives him THAT look, which says, “I see what you’re doing.”

Eventually he might lose control of his emotions and just go for her, sometimes with his special sound, his “name” for her, which is usually cut short by what happens next… as seen in this video, first at normal speed and then in slow motion.
All music by DC Cardwell
Film shot and edited by DC Cardwell

Click on the photos for a larger view!

Samuel & DC Cardwell cover “Four Seasons In One Day” by Crowded House

This is from one of our first live webcasts in April 2014. It’s probably Neil Finn’s most famous “Melbourne song”, the achingly beautiful Four Seasons In One Day, from my favourite Crowded House album, Woodface. He wrote and recorded it when the band was based in Melbourne. It’s a common saying that Melbourne can have “four seasons in a day” because the weather can be quite changeable. Rather unusually, the temperature often does “drop away” by as much as 20℃ in a half an hour or so, especially after a period of extremely hot weather.

I won’t deny it – Neil does this better than I do! But I hope you enjoy this version nonetheless. Samuel helps out with some nice guitar and background harmonies. 

Marjorie Cardwell creates beautiful animated iPad music video for her song “Hole In My Head”

There’s a brand new video for Marjorie‘s beautiful song “Hole In My Head!”

And she’s made the most gorgeous animation on her iPad to illustrate the song.

Some of you will know that the song was inspired by her experience last year of being diagnosed with a brain tumour. (Don’t worry – she’s fine now. The tumour was benign and even though she had very major brain surgery she has recovered very well.) She actually wrote most of the song while she was in the MRI machine getting her pre-op scan. We recorded it quickly right before her operation and I (almost) finished it off with some overdubs.

But I couldn’t figure out a good solo to put over the instrumental section. In the car one day, on the way to one of her appointments, I asked Marjorie for ideas. She said, “How about a euphonium?”

And, to our everlasting delight, one of our musical heroes, Don McGlashan (of legendary New Zealand band The Mutton Birds) agreed to play a sublime euphonium solo on it, as only he can do! (I think Marjorie secretly had this in mind.) He recorded the solo in the boatshed on the New Zealand coast that he uses to write his own songs, and sent it to us by email. It’s everything we hoped for and more.

If you enjoy it, please leave a comment underneath the video on Youtube (or here!) and PLEASE share with your friends on Facebook, Twitter etc. 🙂

George Harrison in Graphite and Vinyl – from Marjorie’s archives

Marjorie was a huge fan of George Harrison right from the beginning of his solo career (when she was a very little girl). Here’s a nice portrait she drew of George for her ‘O’ Level Art submission. I recall she left everything to the last minute and did a whole lot of drawings the night before she had to hand them in. We still have the sketch book and it largely consists of this picture of George, a quick self-portrait (also below) and various items around her, e.g. a cup, her hands, her glasses, her boot, a banana etc. They make quite a nice couple, don’t they?

She still has the singles/45’s/7 inches (or what you young hipsters sometimes call the “vinyls” – ugh) to prove that she was a fan when she was just a little girl! She was much more advanced musically than I was at the same age.

You can see the full size version of her George Harrison portrait on our Flickr site at http://www.flickr.com/photos/dc-cardwell/9381761109/.
I wish I had a video or recording of Marjorie singing one of George’s songs, but in the meantime, here’s me doing a ukulele & vocal version “Here Comes The Sun”, one of his two tracks which were major highlights of the Beatles final, iconic “Abbey Road” album.

DC Cardwell’s “I Am Still The Same” video at US film festivals

Student film official selection at SoCal and Newport Beach Film Festivals!

Newport Beach Film Festival -logo
SoCal Film Festival 2012 Badge

“I Am Still the Same”, the remarkable video for DC Cardwell‘s award-winning song, has been selected for two film festivals in California –  the 2012 SoCal Independent Film Festival and the 2013 Newport Beach Film Festival!

The film was directed by David McGorlick, a young Melbourne film student. This is a very well-deserved recognition of his talent, especially considering it was his first serious film.

To further illustrate how remarkable this achievement was, at the Newport Beach festival the film was screened amongst a set of major videos from some particularly stellar artists, including The Black Keys/RZA, Sigur Rós, Alt-J, No Doubt and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros!

 In 2011, McGorlick, who was studying film at university, had asked his friend DC if he could use “I Am Still The Same” in a video for an assignment. DC was happy to allow the use of the song and expected the end result to be proficient but not particularly remarkable as it was the first “proper” film young David had ever made. McGorlick ran his broad ideas past the songwriter for approval, but apart from DC’s firm request that there should be “no overacting!” (he needn’t have worried), the entire creative side of the project was left on McGorlick’s shoulders. 

David McGorlick and DC Cardwell Mar 3 2013 (12-CP)
David McGorlick & DC Cardwell

McGorlick shot the video on a borrowed Canon 7D digital SLR, noted for its ability to impart a “film look”. No extra equipment was used and friends were roped in as actors and crew.

The result was an incredibly profound, thought-provoking and even disturbing statement which took some of the ideas in DC’s award-winning song and cast new light on them.

“I think David is an exciting, emerging talent. I’ve worked with a lot of well known directors and can already see David’s aptitude for storytelling and strong visual sense. Definitely keep an eye on him.” – Michael Garcia, former Creative Vice-President of HBO (Sopranos, Six Feet Under, The Wire, Big Love, True Blood etc.

You can watch this astonishing short film here:

I Am Still The Same: The Story Behind The Song
http://dccardwell.com/i-am-still-the-same/

“I Am Still The Same” on IMDb:
http://www.imdb.com/video/wab/vi3021120025/

“I Am Still The Same” at Newport Beach Film Festival
http://newportbeach.festivalgenius.com/2013/films/iamstillthesame_davidmcgorlick_newportbeach2013

[Updated May 2013]

Postcard for DC Cardwell, David McGorlick music video I Am Still The Same

MUSIC AT THE MISSION: DC Cardwell & Victor Stranges live in Melbourne Docklands 22nd Mar 2013


♦MUSIC AT THE MISSION♦

Presented by Global Onslaught

Victor Stranges & DC Cardwell performed at the launch of this cozy & cool new venue in the Docklands heartland of Melbourne. The (mainly) acoustic show was performed in an intimate courtyard within the historic building, Mission To Seafarers, located in Flinders Street, Melbourne. The evening was presented by Global Onslaught and was the first night of a series of Music At The Mission shows.

Victor & DC performed their own songs to an enthusiastic audience, and also threw in a few covers, accompanied by Joel Cardwell on bass & guitar and Samuel Cardwell on bass & lap steel guitar. Up-and-coming Melbourne singer-songwriter Andrea Kocevska also performed some of her original songs with DC on guitar.

(Thanks to Mondo Quinn for most of these photos.)

Here’s a video of me (DC) singing “Know Me” at the gig, accompanied by Samuel on bass and Joel on guitar. We’d intended having the boys the other way round so Joel was a bit taken by surprise having to play a lead solo on it, but I think he came out of it with his reputation intact! (Thanks to Rod Neason for the clip.)

After the show, I asked someone about the mysterious dome that can be seen down the other end of the building (see the photo at the bottom of this page). I was led down to it and instructed to take my guitar too. Apparently it was a “personal experience” and no one would tell me what was special about it! It turned out that the acoustics are rather astounding. When you stand in the centre and try to speak, there is so much echo that you can’t make out what you’re saying and it’s almost impossible to say a whole sentence, never mind have a conversation! There’s an echo, slightly longer than a “slapback”, that actually seems louder than the original sound you make. When I played guitar, though, it sounded rather beautiful the way the sound bounced around, and I quite happily played it for a while. Then I was asked to sing The Beatles’ Blackbird, and I found it was a little easier to sing than speak. I wouldn’t say it was ideal acoustics for listening, but it was fascinating. Here’s a video that Rod Neason shot of me. Thanks to Jennifer Wallace for the impromptu harmonies!

Victor: www.victorstranges.com
DC: www.dccardwell.com
Andrea: www.reverbnation.com/andreakocevska
Global Onslaught: www.globalonslaught.com


Mission To Seafarers-Docklands-Melbourne
Mission To Seafarers, Melbourne Docklands
The dome is pretty cool, too!

Poster-Music at the Mission-Mission to Seafarers-Melbourne Docklands-DC Cardwell-Victor Stranges-Global Onslaught-Web

 

Christmas Videos by DC Cardwell

“Christmas Must Be Tonight”

Originally by The Band, this song was written by Robbie Robertson and sung by Rick Danko on their 1976 album, “Islands”. In this video, I play regular acoustic guitar while Samuel plays a Baby Taylor tuned in the so-called “Nashville Tuning”.

I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day

From the poem “Christmas Bells” by Longfellow. We decided to perform this in a style heavily influenced by The Byrds, particularly in the guitar figures between verses played by me, and Samuel’s extraordinary Roger McGuinn-like guitar solo. Available on DC’s album Pop Art.

The Day That A Child Appeared

A Larry Norman song from his “Bootleg” album. I played the piano on this recording, trying to get it as close as possible to how it is played on the original, which I’ve always felt was very inventive and clever.

Christmas Time Is Here

My simple piano version of this song by Vince Guaraldi which appears on “A Charlie Brown Christmas” both as an instrumental and a sung version. A hugely evocative Christmas tune for many people!

Crowded House are the reason we’re in Australia

If it weren’t for Crowded House we wouldn’t be living in Australia. Kinda. Sorta. Pretty much.

Marjorie and I came to the band late, not long before Together Alone came out, when I picked up Woodface somewhere on CD and we instantly realised that tracks such as It’s Only Natural and Fall At Your Feet were a kind of music we’d been yearning for but had never really managed to find except in our own heads. We lived in Vancouver, Canada at the time and when we moved there in 1988 from Northern Ireland we were simultaneously perturbed by the prevailing poodle bands on the charts and heartened by the fact that every time we turned on CFMI classic rock radio while driving we heard the likes of Steely Dan, Van Morrison and other artists who seemed forgotten back home, swept away by the punk that we ourselves had loved and followed.

We were both “pop music literate” and knew that Neil had been in Split Enz. We loved I Got You when it was a hit in the UK. I’d heard Better Be Home Soon in the car on this “classic rock radio” which seemed unique to the New World, and been struck by its Beatlesque qualities. And we both knew Don’t Dream It’s Over, of course, and had admired it vaguely from a distance. And I recalled seeing them once on the MTV VMA awards (see video) and being astounded that they seemed to be a real band, playing real instruments and singing a real song. With a Hammond organ! In the 80s! Ever since then I’d made a mental note to buy one of their albums, but it simply didn’t happen until I picked up Woodface at a bargain price in 1993.

Live in Canada

Sadly, drummer Paul Hester had quit the band just two weeks before we first saw them in Vancouver and Seattle, but they were still a revelation live, a band who played smart, concise pop songs in the spirit of the “jam bands” – they never played a song the same way twice and you never knew what was going to happen at any moment. Neil Finn was edgy in the sense that at any moment he felt the freedom to do whichever option popped into his head, whether it was to morph into a random cover, play an extended free-form guitar solo, swap instruments with the drummer, write a song on the spot based on the support band’s setlist, have the band jam along to a demo CD that an aspiring musician threw onto the stage…

19940506-Crowded House-Paramount Theater-Seattle-6-May-1994-backstage pass-DC CardwellCrowded House backstage pass!

We managed to score backstage passes for their Seattle show. The show was great but being backstage afterwards wasn’t the most exciting of experiences. However, I guess there was a certain thrill of anticipation and the pass itself is quite nice!

I was hacking gently into the hospital computer system at my work and discovered that the network was hooked into a mysterious entity, The Internet, involving such things as “gophers”, a search engine named “Veronica” and something called “email”. Much to my surprise I found that there was an active group of Crowded House fans exchanging information, and that I was even able to set up an email account on my home computer using Vancouver’s Freenet text-based email service. Marjorie and I joined this community, known asTongue In The Mail, and in fact we’re still in it (although it’s been partly superseded by the Frenz forum, which I also use).

Trip to New Zealand

At one point in 1995 Crowded House were about to tour New Zealand and there was a vague feeling in the ranks that they might split up soon and this could be their last outing. I vividly recall saying to Marjorie, “You should

Crowded House-Palmerston North-New Zealand-6-Feb-1995-B-ticket-DC CardwellMarjorie’s Ticket for the show in Palmerston North, New Zealand

go and see them!” while realising that this was completely unfeasible. However, she took me at my word and three days later she was in New Zealand! She’d made arrangements to meet up with various people we’d met online, and she traipsed around after the band. Some of the people she met were close to the band and managed to get her backstage where she met, not only the Crowded House members and Tim, but Mr. and Mrs. Finn senior. This was, needless to say, quite a bit of fun. She had coffee with Mike Chunn (Split Enz bass player) and Dave Dobbyn and generally was made very welcome on the other side of the world. Even back then we felt really old and grown-up, having two children and being well settled down, so it seemed almost ridiculous that Marjorie should be on such an adventure. We’d sometimes play our own gigs at Vancouver’s rock clubs, look around and think “we’re old enough to be these people’s parents and I’m sure they think we’re like old fogies from another era!” Of course, looking back, we were only in our early 30s and nearly 20 years later we’re still running after bands and and still playing to people who now could practically be our grandchildren!

Crowded House, New Zealand 1995 - by Marjorie CardwellMarjorie’s photo of Crowded House in New Zealand

But that’s beside the point. Marjorie had a stopover in Melbourne on her way back to Canada. Neither of us had ever been to Australia before, but Marjorie simply fell in love with this city. Another internet friend took her round to see some of the Crowdie sites, such as Paul Hester’s café and Neil Finn’s old house where he wrote many of the Woodface songs.

When she returned to Vancouver, Marjorie simply said “We should move to Melbourne, it’s really nice!” Of course, this is easier said than done, especially when you have two small kids and an elderly mother-in-law (Marjorie’s mother) who lives with you. But we got the permanent residence visa application forms and had a look at them. We’d already emigrated once so the forms weren’t daunting in the least. We figured out that I, as a medical scientist, would have a reasonable chance of being accepted, but that if you were over 35 you had extra “points” taken off which would effectively scupper your chances of getting a visa.

However, two weeks before I turned 35, I mentioned that if we didn’t do it now we’d never get a visa. So we sent of the forms just so that we could say we’d had a go. Very shortly afterwards we got a letter saying that we’d been accepted into Australia! No interview or anything! And with that piece of paper in hand, we decided we may as well go and see what it’s like to live in Australia.And anyway, Vancouver is “really nice” too, to say the least! It consistently vies with Melbourne for the title of “The World’s Most Livable City” and it’s undeniably beautiful and comfortable. And we loved the Canadian people and had many close friends. So we filled out the forms but didn’t bother sending them.

We moved in 1996, two boys and aging mother-in-law in tow (she’s still living with us 16 years later!) and have never regretted it, despite occasionally longing for real mountains, snow, the smell of cedar and the warm hospitality of Canadians… not that Australians aren’t hospitable, but they’re different.

Move to Australia

We stopped over in Auckland on our way to Australia, and were wined and dined very generously by ex-Split Enz members Paul Crowther and Mike Chunn. (We’d previously met Paul Crowther at a Mutton Birds show in Vancouver’s Railway Club when we popped in after our own gig over the road.)

ENZSO-Melbourne Park-Melbourne-4-Feb-1997-ticket-DC Cardwell

ENZSO Ticket (Split Enz with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra) 1997, Melbourne

One of our ENZSO tickets

As soon as we arrived in Melbourne we heard that there was to be an ENZSO concert in the Rod Laver Arena. Exasperatingly, we couldn’t afford to go but I got a job after only two weeks and the first thing I did was buy tickets. Due to a slight misadventure we arrived slightly late and it was a very bizarre feeling to walk into a packed arena-sized venue and hear a full orchestra playing Six Months In A Leaky Boat with the audience lapping it up!

We’ve seen an amazing run of Finn-related events here in the hometown of Split Enz and Crowded House. The most memorable – sorry, unforgettable – were the warm-up shows for the Sydney Opera House Farewell To The World mega-show in which we got to see Crowded House with Paul Hester two nights in a row, up close, at the intimate Corner Hotel, thus more than making up for having missed out on seeing him with Crowded House before he quit them. It was very much a “who would have thunk?” experience for us.

We saw two more impromptu reunions of core members Finn, Seymour and Hester, one at “Hessie’s Shed” in the Espy Hotel, St Kilda and one at the TV recording of a Neil Finn solo show. And then, tragically, Paulo was gone, his life snuffed out by his own hand in this very city. But that awful incident doesn’t erase our memories of the sheer, joyful, uninhibited exuberance that he personified on stage.

Ticket for Corner Hotel warm-up show, 1996Ticket for Corner Hotel warm-up show, 1996

We got to see another Crowded House warm-up at the Corner Hotel, this time for their comeback tour. And it was surprisingly magnificent! Neither Marjorie nor I have warmed hugely to the two albums by the reunified band (save for about three great tracks on the first one which are up there with their greatest work), but the live shows have been almost as good as ever. And it’s typically admirable of Finn and Co. that they haven’t just done the get-together-and-play-the-old-hits-for-the-money-on-a-nostalgia-tour thing, but they’ve done it as a real band, written new material and simply carried on from where they left off. We may never get another Woodface, but on the other hand, perhaps we will!

~ DC Cardwell

NOTE: This is a quick, rough piece that I wrote as a comment on another blog, but it got too big so I posted it here instead. I may well come back to it , tidy it up and expand (or maybe contract) it later on. It’s also subject to revision by Marjorie if I’ve got some of the facts wrong!

Just Give Me Something Worth Voting For!

I’m not American, but watch the video below for my views on the US Presidential Election. Or any election, for that matter! Feel free to share the poster… and vote well! ~ DC