DC Cardwell now on Pandora Radio!

My music is now on Pandora!

I think this is good! To tell you the truth, I’d never previously used the service before, although I’ve signed up for it now, as a user as well as an artist. I’m sure a lot of you are already familiar with it. (At least those of you who live in the US, Australia and New Zealand – it’s restricted to those territories for the time being.)

What is Pandora Radio?

DC Cardwell on Pandora Music

Yes, that’s me on right after Fairport Convention

It’s been around for a while. Much longer than Spotify, in fact it was founded in 1999 – that’s the last century! A long time ago in the world of music streaming. Many years ago I was visiting a new acquaintance and, to my amazement, she and her teenage kids were happily enjoying music streamed from Pandora into their living room. I’d vaguely heard of it but was actually quite surprised and impressed that people I knew were actually using it! It seemed a bit Jetsons to me. In a good way. Oh yes, this was just down the road, but my friend was American so that explained why she was using something so cool and modern! Some things never change – she probably had a microwave too.

If you’re not familiar with it, basically, the deal is that you tell it some of the artists you like, and it suggests other music that it feels is similar to what you like. You can then give  thumbs up or thumbs down to what you hear, and Pandora will refine the music it plays for you.  You can listen to it in a web browser (i.e. what you browse the internet with) or with an app on your iPhone or similar smartphone.

The Music Genome Project

This is all done by a combination of science and human experts, as far as I can tell. You may have heard of the Human Genome Project, which was (very loosely speaking) a massive scientific project to identify the components up of human DNA. Well, Pandora is based on The Music Genome Project, which, according to Wikipedia, was “developed by [Will] Glaser with musical input from [Tim] Westergren. The idea was to create a separate, individualized radio station for each user having just the “good” music on it, with none of the “junk” that other users like. In order to achieve that goal, they had to bring different styles

The Beatles followed up by John Lennon live on Pandora

The Beatles followed up by John Lennon live on Pandora

of music together into a predictable pattern for analysis. They created 400 specifications for each song that is then compared to the listener’s preferences in order to suggest other songs or artists with similar characteristics.”

The writer of this article assumes that “Pandora’s team of curators expects excellence from all the music they accept. As Tim Westergren, Pandora’s founder, has said:  “You have to earn your way into Pandora.”

So that’s nice 🙂

Is it Really A Good Thing?

There has been some controversy recently about Pandora’s rates of payment to the artists. I’m not really interested in getting into that argument in this post.  At this point in my career I only know one thing for sure – that my main aim is to get my music heard by as many people as possible! And it seems to me that Pandora is a good way of getting it into the ears of the very people who might like it, but would never have heard it otherwise. We all know that algorithms are changing our lives in ways that would have been unimaginable a generation ago. Well, for me, right now, I’m happy to have the Music Genome Project’s algorithms on my side.

What can YOU do to help?

Don’t sign up for Pandora simply because of me! But, on the other hand, it’s easy to signup, and, well, I’ve had it trundling along in another browser tab while writing this post and, I have to admit, it’s been really effective at playing music I like.

I’m really fussy about the music I listen to (“No! You’re kidding!”my sarcastic friends), but it has kept it on the right path so far – I have enjoyed practically everything I’ve heard, to my amazement, really.

OK, I’ve helped it out by clicking the “Add Variety” button and typing in the names of artists I like, and you can do that to, but it’s also come up with a lot of other artists I wouldn’t have normally listened to. I’ve given two or three thumbs down, that’s all. (Not telling you who to!)

So if you’re already using it, or fancy giving it a chance, you could help me by typing in MY name. Or just find me at http://pandora.com/dc-cardwell – and when my songs are playing, click on the THUMBS UP button!

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How To Get Your Music On Pandora Radio

Having said that, until recently it really was difficult to be featured on Pandora unless you were signed to a major record label or publisher. But they have at last made it possible for anyone to apply for submission. There are certain conditions you have to fulfill, and even then you’re not guaranteed to be accepted. Obviously they still want to maintain their reputation of serving up good music for their listeners. But if you’re an artist, you can submit your music at Pandora Submission Page.  You should set up your own listener account first, unless you’re in a country which doesn’t have the service, in which case you should first email musicandcomedy@pandora.com and they will help you.

– DC  (http://pandora.com/dc-cardwell)

How Social Networking Has Been A Game Changer For Musicians

DC Cardwell with Aria FA71 guitarDC Cardwell is a singer-songwriter, originally from Northern Ireland, now based in Melbourne, Australia. This part-universal, part-personal post was prompted by a question from a friend on “how social media has helped musicians”.


I believe that social networking has had the most profound impact on the relationship between musician and listener since the twin-pronged technological advances of recording and broadcasting in the early 20th century.

Both of those inventions allowed musicians to reach the listener without having to be in the same physical place and time. Before they came along, almost the only ways for an artist to propagate their music were by printed sheet music or by the folk process of memorization and repetition.

But the entire game has been changed again with the advent of social networking (and its close relative social media)

Unrecorded: How it used to be.

Old Graphophone (Gramophone, Phonograph) with horn

This record player is even older than me.

The value of social networking for music-makers is perhaps most starkly illustrated when we’re talking about a particular class of artists, of which I am one.

I’m referring to that large set of creative musicians who have learned to play music in their youth, been incredibly passionate about it, but never done it seriously or professionally. Instead, they’ve put the bulk of their resources and energies into other careers, marriage, raising children, other non-musical pursuits, or less creative musical occupations.

I found myself firmly entrenched in this position during the  “noughties”. Any chance of a music career had slipped away many years previously. I’d married young and my children were already well on their way towards adulthood. I’d had a perfectly good career in pathology for many years, but, for me, it had simply been a way of putting food on the table.

However, during those years just after the new millenium began, I acquired some computer recording software and a few microphones and started to make the kind of music that I’d been developing in my head over the years. Primarily a guitarist, I even learned to sing a bit, just to make things more interesting, and I began writing songs that I thought were reasonably OK.

Screenshot from DC Cardwell's Adobe Audition session for his song Birthday Present

My multitrack session for “Birthday Present”

I was astounded to find that I could record tracks that were of near-studio quality. Due to digital technology and decreasing costs, I could make music that, twenty years previously, would have required the finances and resources of a large record company and an expensive recording studio.

But who was going to hear this music? Sure, I could burn a few CDs and pass them around to friends. I could do some gigs around town, but it was far-fetched for a middle-aged family man with a mortgage to pack his gear into a van and hit the road, widening his audience by traveling the length and breadth of the country playing to whomever would listen.

It was also a long-shot to expect any record company to be interested in a distinctly unglamorous looking forty-something.

Tom Is Everybody’s Friend: MySpace changes everything!

WARNING: stuff about me for a while here!

But around 2004-05 I started hearing about MySpace. I was fortunate to be one of the computer-literate people who was already very comfortable with the Internet, and had even had some experience of primitive social networking. For example, by playing an online word-game I’d found that I could easily make friends with people from around the world. MySpace amplified this ability a hundredfold, also adding images and music to the mix.

I uploaded one or two of my songs to that pioneering network, and to my surprise and considerable delight, discovered that some people actually quite

DC Cardwell's Tom Song in Myspace player - screenshot

My Tom Song in the old Myspace player (screenshot)

liked my songs and even my hitherto unknown singing voice.

I even wrote a song about the network’s founder, “MySpace Tom” Anderson – not a joke song, but a wry 60s/70s-style pop song which answered a question I was often asked by newcomers: “Who is this Tom guy on my friend list?”

My song was called Tom Is Everybody’s Friend and, for a few days after it got mentioned on Tom’s own page, it went viral (or, at, least semi-viral) before the term was even known. I watched my friend count shoot up rapidly and had to field a huge amount of comments and messages. Suddenly I could really see the power of this new social network to get my music out to people all over the world. It was pretty amazing!

Meet The Author: How has social networking helped my music career?

That was the real birth of my new career. Since then I haven’t been one of those lucky enough to make large amounts of money from my music, but I’ve released my first album, Some Hope, recorded some songs in Los Angeles for a film, won a song contest, played a fair number of live shows in my own city of Melbourne, and, above all, developed a faithful, far-flung following of fans all over the world!

I’ve even gone one step further and quit my lifelong career in pathology to do music full-time.

(I’ve been very fortunate in that my wife, Marjorie Cardwell (now there’s a singer!) began a new career after several years of study, and now she supports me as I previously did her. With my new-found skills I was also able to record an album for her, release it and do the bulk of the necessary social networking required to build a fan base for her.)

Most of my middle-aged peers don’t reach that stage of being able to quite their day job, but the point remains – they can still find (and be found by) fans and distribute their music to the four corners of the earth, largely by means of social networking.

Of course, other ancillary online tools, such as blogs, Tunecore, CD Baby, iTunes, FanBridge, Internet radio etc. are also important, but social networking is the human factor of the Internet by which the independent artist connects with existing and new fans.

And, as we all know, the scene doesn’t remain static. We’ve talked about MySpace, and that was the beginning for many of us slightly older folk. But MySpace suddenly lost ground to Facebook and Twitter.

YouTube has of course, become a major platform for people to find and listen to music, and I did go through a phase of serious networking on it, despite its inadequate social interface. However, a while back my YouTube channels were suddenly shut down, I lost all my followers and view counts, and I had to start all over again so that was a bit of a setback from which I haven’t yet recovered! Google has been making improvements to the YouTube interface but in my opinion it’s still, unfortunately, too clunky to be taken very seriously as a social network. Speaking as a video creator, I do hope that it improves in that regard. But I suspect most video consumers aren’t particularly hungry for a better social experience on YouTube. At present, Youtube’s main role is as a repository for our “product”. 

Similarly, Reverbnation and Soundcloud have bubbled along as perhaps the best frees platform for uploading pure music to be shared on Facebook, although, for me, their social value has been much less significant.

Right now (late 2013) my main social platform of choice is Instagram, which may surprise some. For some reason Twitter never quite clicked with me in a sustainable way, but the addition of photographs and removal of the 140 character limit just happens to sit well with my personality.

Way With Words: How does social networking work for musicians?

Social networking is, of course, mainly a verbal medium. Photographs, sounds and videos can be a part of it, but the glue that holds it together is words.

Screenshot of a comment on DC Cardwell's MySpace page

A comment on my MySpace page from the classic mid-noughties era (thanks Jess!)

I remember how, as a young music fan, I was hungry for any information about my musical heroes. I used to collect interviews and articles – physically cut them out of magazines (I can hear some of you young kids sniggering down at the back) – and file them away. You couldn’t just look stuff up. Articles and photographs came in a trickle and you had to be alert in case you missed anything.

If I ever got the chance to say one or two words to an artist I loved it was just unbelievable good fortune! Can you imagine how unlikely that was back in those days?

But that human factor is much more readily available these days, if the artist is savvy enough to use the social networks. I’ve had conversations online with many of my favourite artists. And I’ve also found myself chatting with people I didn’t know and only later discovering that they are brilliant singers, songwriters or musicians. It’s quite nice when friendship comes first and fanship comes afterwards.

Very often people get to know me, and I get to know them, and it’s quite some time before they even find out that I make music. I’ve always been very careful not to be mercenary or cynical in my approach. I really, genuinely, do make friends with the people I meet online! People are smart and, by and large, they know if you’re being disingenuous.

However, I suspect that even if you’re not that good at chatting with people online, you can still make good use of social networking to advance your music career. It isn’t all about lengthy heart-to-heart conversations. here are other ways of using your natural characteristics to attract friends/followers/fans online. If you’re blessed with pithy wit I’m sure you can use that to gather followers. (I suspect that kind of person is even more likely to find their true home on Twitter.) You might be very knowledgeable about some subject – perhaps your favourite band or music style. You might be very beautiful (or at least buff up really well for photographs.)

Social networking is a reflection of life so there is no set way to make things work for you or for me. If it’s not an organic, dynamic process it’s probably doomed to failure. And I know that some artists will just never get it – will never be able to sit at a computer, or stare at their smartphone and see it as a portal to real, living, breathing people. You have to admire people like that, you really do! And just hope that they find another way of getting their music noticed.

In A Thousand Years: What does the future hold for social networking?

It’s hard to imagine social networking going away. Like the post office or telephone they are simply a part of life now. Many websites and platforms that aren’t primarily social still have a social networking element to them. In a way, it’s simply another string to the technological bow. But in my opinion it’s a game changer (I know, we all hate that cliché!) for musicians, and for anyone who is creative and wishes to make their art findable.

We’ve all read about how some extremely famous artists (if I mention Justin Bieber will it put this post up the rankings?) have made their careers solely by virtue of social networking platforms. And sometimes it’s even true. But for every megastar who has shot meteorically to worldwide fame, there are a thousand creative musicians who have slowly and steadily gathered many friends and fans who are hungry for good music.

And the good news is that, unlike major record companies, unlike the press, unlike radio and TV, these social networks are available to all!

Of course, none of this applies solely to people who had previously considered themselves “past their use-by date”. It’s just as important for most younger musicians. But I feel that examples such as mine are illustrative of the power in social networking.

Social networking is (or can be) important for almost every artist today! And even more so for every one who doesn’t have a record company, agent, publisher or other corporate entity to spread their music for them.

But for the non-touring, day-job-working, family-raising, or just stay-at-home artist, it’s absolutely essential and it makes possible what was previously impossible.

Twenty years ago almost every truly independent artist was severely restricted in their reach. Yes, there were a few early pioneers who kicked down doors and walls through sheer force of will. But with the advent of social networking the world became smaller – a lot smaller – for those of us who want our music to be heard beyond our own four walls.

Know Me: True fulfillment as a musician.

DC Cardwell's Some Hope CD

It still blows me away that (at my age)  I have become a singer-songwriter who releases albums!

That connection with the listener, and therefore the realization that my music is being enjoyed and appreciated, is the single most important thing for me as an artist. It’s worth more than money, by far. It’s what tells me what I’m doing is worthwhile!

Yes – I’m enough of an artist that self-expression is absolutely essential to me. And my motivation is, as I often say, “to make the kind of music that I want to hear.”

But beyond the actual act of making music, the most gratifying moment for me is when someone says to me, “Your song means a lot to me!” Or “Those words made me cry because I can relate to what you’re saying.” Or, “I can’t get that riff of yours out of my head!”  

Or, perhaps best of all, that most profound of inarticulate phrases, “Your music rocks!”

And the true beauty of social networks to me is that I get this kind of affirmation almost every day!

Now THAT is a result!

DC Cardwell

Listen to DC’s music here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merry Christmas! Plus new videos!

Thanks for your support throughout 2012 and if you only found time to open and read one email from us, we really appreciate it!

It’s been an interesting year for us, with DC finally giving up his day-job 100% and Marjorie being diagnosed with a brain tumour

That experience precipitated Marjorie’s very swiftly conceived and realised album,

And both our “boys”, Joel & Samuel, (whom you will know from some of our recordings and videos) graduated from university just recently. Samuel received his BA from the University Of Melbourne, and Joel passed his law degree at Monash University to add to the BA that he already has! They’re clever boys and we’re very proud of them, needless to say. Although we’re slightly worried that they’ll end up in academic careers or high-powered legal jobs when we’d prefer that they carry on the family tradition of being ROCK STARS. Haha.

We’d also like to share two new recordings with you: The first is DC’s cover of the famous, and very moving Christmas carol, “I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day” which he just finished yesterday. Actually, Samuel did half of the work – he plays bass and drums and also the amazing guitar solo. The aim was to make it sound like The Byrds and whether or not that was successful overall, Samuel’s solo is a dead ringer for Roger McGuinn!

There’s an interesting and touching story behind this song, the words of which were written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow during the American Civil War. The story is related in this video, along with the complete lyrics to the song.

Please download it for free from Bandcamp by clicking HERE so that you can add it to your Christmas Music collection! But you can also watch (and share) this video which includes the very moving story behind the song.

dc cardwell - i heard the bells on christmas day (with lyrics - in the style of the byrds)

The other song we’d like to share an old standard that Marjorie has covered for an upcoming Rick Nelson tribute album. It’s called Stars Fell On Alabama and it was written by Mitchell Parish and Frank Perkins in 1934. It’s previously been covered by many artists including Lee Wiley, Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong; John Coltrane; Jack Teagarden; Jimmy Buffett; Billie Holiday; Anita O’Day; Dean Martin; Kay Starr; Frank Sinatra; Doris Day; Frankie Laine; Erroll Garner; Don Rondo; Kate Smith; Mel Torme; Renee Olstead; Ricky Nelson; Stan Getz; Ben Webster; Ralph Marterie and Cannonball Adderley.

Marjorie also made this quaint and amusing video using a very famous old (VERY old) film called A Trip to the Moon (French: Le Voyage dans la lune), a 1902 French black-and-white silent science fiction film directed by Georges Méliès.

marjorie cardwell - stars fell on alabama (from legacy: a tribute to rick nelson)

Have a very safe, joyous & peaceful Christmas with your family and friends, and may you have a very blessed New Year!

~ Marjorie & DC xo

The End Of the World is nigh! Come and celebrate with DC’s new eschatological song!

The 21st of December 2012 is the End Of The World according to the ancient Mayans. They were wrong of course, because they didn’t know squat about anything, and their world ended long before 2012, anyway.

But have you ever considered how ephemeral life on earth is for all of us? Have you ever ever wondered if you’ll wake up and find yourself dead? Have you ever wondered if the oil will run out before we all fry? Have you ever wondered…

Wait a minute, that’s a sermon and I don’t do sermons, I write songs.

Go to http://noisetrade.com/dccardwell to get

Go to my Bandcamp page to hear my newest song, The Sun, The Moon, The Stars, which is about all that kind of stuff (if you want it to be).

The song features me on vocals, guitars, bass and piano, and Samuel plays drums, synth and glockenspiel, and it’s a bit of an epic, really, by my standards.

So if you haven’t already, grab it NOW or you may have to wait until my next album comes out in 2013. If we’re still around then!

~ DC


The Sun, The Moon, The Stars
LYRICS © DC Cardwell 2012

The sun, the moon, the stars
Jupiter and Mars
Everybody thinks they know
Where they’re gonna be tonight
The fuel in your tank
The money in your bank
Everybody thinks they know
Where they’re gonna be tonight

But I don’t know what time it is
Something big is falling on my head
But I don’t know what time it is
I try to remember what my teacher said
You’re on your own now

You’re on your own now

The dinner on your table
The power in your cable
Everybody thinks they know
Where they’re gonna be tonight
The pictures in your camera
The things that you remember
Everybody thinks they know
Where they’re gonna be tonight

But I don’t know what time it is
Something big is falling on my head
But I don’t know what time it is
I try to remember what my teacher said
You’re on your own now

You’re on your own now

The mountains and your bed
The things inside your head
Everybody thinks they know
Where they’re gonna be tonight

But I don’t know what time it is
Something big is falling on my head
But I don’t know what time it is
I try to remember what my teacher said
You’re on your own now

You’re on your own now

PLEASE SHARE this LINK WITH YOUR FRIENDS TOO!
The Sun, The Moon, The Stars

Marjorie Cardwell’s new album on Madcar Records!

Hi, DC here,

I just wanted to mention that we’ve sent Marjorie‘s album off to the plant for pressing. Quite exciting! We haven’t set an exact release date yet but it will be available to you sometime in the next 4-8 weeks, maybe even sooner. The sleeve design was painted by Marjorie and it’s very beautiful. If you’re on Facebook, she could use a few “LIKES” on her Facebook Fan Page at facebook.com/marjoriecardwellmusic

I’m pretty confident that if you like my music you’ll also like hers, so I hope you don’t mind me simply including her news in my news. I’m heavily involved and the instruments are almost all played by Marjorie, me and our sons, Samuel & Joel. She wrote all the songs except one, which is a cover of one of my songs (I feel honoured!) and we produced the album together. This is the logo of our new record label… Madcar Records!

Madcar Records logo

There are also two very special guest musicians, one of whom, drummer Chris Haylock very sadly died of cancer just over a week ago. Chris was a very good friend and this has been very heartbreaking for us. He leaves behind his wonderful wife Cath and three children, two of whom are just little toddlers. Some of us are working on some kind of fund-raising CD to help his family – probably an album of songs that he played on.

One of those songs might be this Sam Phillips song, “I Need Love” we recorded in my studio a few years ago. It’s just a jam where I hit “record”, but it came out quite well. Chris, as always, held things together beautifully – that’s him on the photo. Just click on the picture to hear the song.

The other guest musician on Marjorie’s album is actually quite famous and one of our greatest musical heroes, so we’re naturally very thrilled about that! More news soon…

*************************

But enough about Marjorie! I will be going back to work on my own album very soon and it will be out later this year. We don’t have room under our bed for 2000 CDs so we’re going to have to come up with some genius way of parting with them!

I’ve been working hard to rebuild my lost Youtube channels. Since my last email I’ve started a “covers” channel at youtube.com/DCCardwellsCovers so please visit, subscribe, comment, rate, and (best of all for me) SHARE my videos on Facebook!

Actually, speaking of sharing, there’s nothing better you can do for us than share our music. For example, you can click the “SHARE” button on a Youtube video and pass it along to your Facebook wall, or to individual friends, or to Twitter, or in an email.

I try to make my web addresses easy to remember, so you can easily share my website (www.dccardwell.com) or my online store (MadcarRecords.com) on Facebook or wherever you like.

Thanks for reading!

~ DC

PS: I had just listened to a very long “webinar” and when they said that far more music sales are made through emails than through social networking, I decided it was time for another email newsletter. But I forgot say anywhere “Please buy my music!” But try to imagine those 2000 CDs (plus many unsold copies of Some Hope) cluttering up Madcar Records, AKA “our house” 😉

Or there’s always iTunes – if you think some record company is eating up all the profits, let me assure that, for us, Apple gets 30% and we get the rest, so every sale really does help!

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Describe my music and win the only piece of DC Cardwell merchandise in existence! Plus CDs! [CONTEST NOW CLOSED]

A lot of us (ahem) “artists” have trouble describing our own music. We just make it. We like to think we don’t sound like anyone else.

But everyone tells us we need an “Elevator Pitch” – in other words, if we bump into a top music executive, or even a normal human being, in an elevator, we need to be able to describe our music in the time it takes to reach the next floor. For example “My music sounds like a combination of artist X with artist Y and it does such-and-such.”

So here’s a simple giveaway I’m running. Write an Elevator Pitch for my music. Imagine you’re in that elevator and someone asks you, “What does DC Cardwell sound like?” What would you say?

The contest will be judged by some of my close friends and family who already know what I sound like and they can decide which comments are the most accurate/creative/honest/useful/hyperbolic/funny/sad.

PLEASE NOTE: Entries for this contest closed at midnight (Pacific Standard Time) on the 29th February, 2012.

FIRST PRIZE: A signed copy of my Some Hope CD and the only “DC Cardwell T-shirt” in existence! It’s white, size XL,  with a small, tasteful logo so it shouldn’t be TOO embarrassing to wear. You could probably cover up the logo with a large badge/button featuring a much cooler artist of your choice.

SECOND PRIZE: A signed copy of my Some Hope CD

To enter, simply type your answer to the question “What does DC Cardwell sound like?” in the comment box below, and don’t forget to include your name and email address (which won’t be visible).

Good luck, and pass it on to your friends too!

~ DC

PS: If you don’t know what I sound like, you can hear my music on almost every page of this website!

The T-shirt is brand new and unworn and it came free with some business cards, in case you’re wondering where I got it, and, more to the point, why! Here it is with my “Some Hope” CD.

LATEST!

Here’s 2nd-prize winner Beth showing off her prize!

Beth Howell with her prize, DC's album "Some Hope"

Beth Howell with her prize, DC’s album “Some Hope”

New Beatles solo covers – check ’em out!

Hi – DC here!

We came back from a trip to Ireland a few weeks ago and on my return I decided to focus on updating my Youtube channels and adding some more videos.

I have new original songs in the pipeline but people on Youtube seem to love covers so I’ve been knocking off a few and plan to do more as it’s kinda fun and easy 🙂

My latest two have both been Beatles’ solo songs.

Just yesterday I filmed this version of John Lennon’s “Love”

And last week, after seeing the George Harrison documentary by Martin Scorsese, I recorded this ukulele version of “Here Comes The Sun”.

I hope you like them. Please share on Facebook and via email. And if you’re on Youtube, I’d LOVE you to subscribe to my channels so you can hear about each new video I upload.

Here are the links to our three channels.

Thanks for watching & listening!

~ DC

PRESS
“Melbourne’s DC Cardwell is a singer-songwriter that should appeal to fans of Neil Finn and David Grahame, and he has the ability to excel on both the slower, acoustic numbers as well as the up-tempo pop gems. You’ll only need to go a few tracks into Some Hope to realize this as the beautiful, gentle opener “I Am Still the Same” and the lovely, spare “Birthday Present” are followed by the catchy power pop of “Peace and Love”. Aside from these three, there are plenty of instant classics to go around like the breezy “Way With Words”, the harmonica and handclaps of “A Minute of Your Time”, and the jangly “Tom is Everybody’s Friend”. 16 tracks in all here, so it’s quality and quantity.”  Steve, Absolute Powerpop

“DC Cardwell creates a heart felt acoustic gem here, full of wonderful melodic hooks and a Ray Davies styled vocal. The gentle minor chords and harmonies that open “I Am Still The Same” are both brilliant and poignant. “Birthday Present” is another example of solid composition and a revelatory Harrison styled guitar break. Some of the mid-tempo ballads (“The Quiet Ages”) are like magical combinations of both Paul Simon and McCartney.”  Aaron Kupferberg, Powerpopaholic

“I have a great respect for your songwriting and style. You have a unique delivery that for the uninitiated conjures the vocal prowess of Thom York blended with the edge of John Lennon and a tip of the hat to Bob Dylan.”  Doug Mitchell (Recording engineer/producer),

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