Goodbye Farewell (Larry Norman song) with Lyrics and Chords

From our Numubu webcast

on 26th April 2014: our cover of Larry Norman’s beautiful song “Goodbye Farewell”

Samuel is playing our Tanglewood TW15CE-B  guitar and I’m on my old Mugen “the ’78”

DC and Samuel on webcast

Still from the video

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This is taken at a bit of a clip, I think! But you can hear the songs at a more stately pace in this old video of me performing it a few years ago:

LYRICS & CHORDS
(written by Larry Norman)

Goodbye, farewell, we’ll meet again (D, Bm, F#m,)
Somewhere beyond the sky. (D, Bm, F#m, A7)
I pray that you will stay with God (G, Em, D, Bm)
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye. (D, A7, D-G, D-G)

The light grows dim but in this hour (D, Bm, F#m,)
I have no tears to cry. (D, Bm, F#m, A7)
My heart is full, my joy complete. (G, Em, D, Bm)
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye. (D, A7, D-G, D-G)

I feel no loss of hope as I’ve grown older. (Bm, G, D)
Only this world’s weight upon my shoulder. (Bm, E7, Em7, A7)

My heart beats to a slower song, (D, Bm, F#m,)
So softly in my veins. (D, Bm, F#m, A7)
The night is warm, but in my sleep (G, Em, D, Bm)
I dream of heaven’s reign. (D, A7, D-G, D-G)

Everything I am I’ve tried to show you, (Bm, G, D)
In this life I’ve been so blessed to know you. (Bm, E7, Em7, A7)

Goodbye, farewell, we’ll meet again (D, Bm, F#m,)
Somewhere beyond the sky. (D, Bm, F#m, A7)
I pray that you will walk with God (G, G#dim, F#m, Bm)
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye. (Em, A7, Bm, E7)
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye. (Em, A7, D)

For my original music videos go to http://www.youtube.com/DCCardwellsMusic

More covers at http://www.youtube.com/dccardwellcovers

Thanks for listening! ~ DC

Samuel & DC Cardwell cover “Four Seasons In One Day” by Crowded House

This is from one of our first live webcasts in April 2014. It’s probably Neil Finn’s most famous “Melbourne song”, the achingly beautiful Four Seasons In One Day, from my favourite Crowded House album, Woodface. He wrote and recorded it when the band was based in Melbourne. It’s a common saying that Melbourne can have “four seasons in a day” because the weather can be quite changeable. Rather unusually, the temperature often does “drop away” by as much as 20℃ in a half an hour or so, especially after a period of extremely hot weather.

I won’t deny it – Neil does this better than I do! But I hope you enjoy this version nonetheless. Samuel helps out with some nice guitar and background harmonies. 

MUSIC AT THE MISSION: DC Cardwell & Victor Stranges live in Melbourne Docklands 22nd Mar 2013


♦MUSIC AT THE MISSION♦

Presented by Global Onslaught

Victor Stranges & DC Cardwell performed at the launch of this cozy & cool new venue in the Docklands heartland of Melbourne. The (mainly) acoustic show was performed in an intimate courtyard within the historic building, Mission To Seafarers, located in Flinders Street, Melbourne. The evening was presented by Global Onslaught and was the first night of a series of Music At The Mission shows.

Victor & DC performed their own songs to an enthusiastic audience, and also threw in a few covers, accompanied by Joel Cardwell on bass & guitar and Samuel Cardwell on bass & lap steel guitar. Up-and-coming Melbourne singer-songwriter Andrea Kocevska also performed some of her original songs with DC on guitar.

(Thanks to Mondo Quinn for most of these photos.)

Here’s a video of me (DC) singing “Know Me” at the gig, accompanied by Samuel on bass and Joel on guitar. We’d intended having the boys the other way round so Joel was a bit taken by surprise having to play a lead solo on it, but I think he came out of it with his reputation intact! (Thanks to Rod Neason for the clip.)

After the show, I asked someone about the mysterious dome that can be seen down the other end of the building (see the photo at the bottom of this page). I was led down to it and instructed to take my guitar too. Apparently it was a “personal experience” and no one would tell me what was special about it! It turned out that the acoustics are rather astounding. When you stand in the centre and try to speak, there is so much echo that you can’t make out what you’re saying and it’s almost impossible to say a whole sentence, never mind have a conversation! There’s an echo, slightly longer than a “slapback”, that actually seems louder than the original sound you make. When I played guitar, though, it sounded rather beautiful the way the sound bounced around, and I quite happily played it for a while. Then I was asked to sing The Beatles’ Blackbird, and I found it was a little easier to sing than speak. I wouldn’t say it was ideal acoustics for listening, but it was fascinating. Here’s a video that Rod Neason shot of me. Thanks to Jennifer Wallace for the impromptu harmonies!

Victor: www.victorstranges.com
DC: www.dccardwell.com
Andrea: www.reverbnation.com/andreakocevska
Global Onslaught: www.globalonslaught.com


Mission To Seafarers-Docklands-Melbourne
Mission To Seafarers, Melbourne Docklands
The dome is pretty cool, too!

Poster-Music at the Mission-Mission to Seafarers-Melbourne Docklands-DC Cardwell-Victor Stranges-Global Onslaught-Web

 

Christmas Videos by DC Cardwell

“Christmas Must Be Tonight”

Originally by The Band, this song was written by Robbie Robertson and sung by Rick Danko on their 1976 album, “Islands”. In this video, I play regular acoustic guitar while Samuel plays a Baby Taylor tuned in the so-called “Nashville Tuning”.

I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day

From the poem “Christmas Bells” by Longfellow. We decided to perform this in a style heavily influenced by The Byrds, particularly in the guitar figures between verses played by me, and Samuel’s extraordinary Roger McGuinn-like guitar solo. Available on DC’s album Pop Art.

The Day That A Child Appeared

A Larry Norman song from his “Bootleg” album. I played the piano on this recording, trying to get it as close as possible to how it is played on the original, which I’ve always felt was very inventive and clever.

Christmas Time Is Here

My simple piano version of this song by Vince Guaraldi which appears on “A Charlie Brown Christmas” both as an instrumental and a sung version. A hugely evocative Christmas tune for many people!

Complete DC Cardwell Band gig on Youtube

You can watch the whole DC Cardwell Band show at Ha’penny Bridge, Frankston from Jan 13 – just click on the thumbnail at the end of this post. All the songs will play one after the other, and you can also find them individually on my Youtube Channel (youtube.com/dccardwellsmusic)  if you’d rather dip in a song at a time.

This was our first gig with Victor Stranges on drums, and it also features my sons Joel and Samuel Cardwell on bass and guitar, respectively. No acoustic guitars in sight so it was a rock show with lots of guitar solos and a fair bit of jangling going on too. Please comment and rate the video and it would be good if you would also subscribe to my channel – it all helps the cause!

The Adjectival Bob Dylan

Today we have a guest host – our son Samuel Cardwell posted this on Facebook and it’s too good not to share with the world!

___________________

This morning my father and I were talking about how rubbish it would have been if people had kept calling albums things like ‘With the Beatles’ and ‘The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan,’ and I got to wondering what it would have been like if Bob had kept using ‘The + Adjective+ Bob Dylan’ formula throughout his long career. I think it would have gone something like this:

  • The Hillbilly Bob Dylan (Bob Dylan)
  • The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan
  • The Political Bob Dylan (The Times They Are A Changin’)
  • The Sarcastic Bob Dylan (Another Side of Bob Dylan)
  • The Dreamin’ Bob Dylan (Bringing It All Back Home)
  • The Growlin’ Bob Dylan (Highway 61 Revisited)
  • The Surreal Bob Dylan (Blonde on Blonde)
  • The Garagey Bob Dylan (The Basement Tapes)
  • The Countrified Bob Dylan (John Wesley Harding)
  • The Weird-Voiced Bob Dylan (Nashville Skyline)
  • The Desultory Bob Dylan (Self Portrait)
  • The Optimistic Bob Dylan (New Morning)
  • The Cinematic Bob Dylan (Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid)
  • The Desultory Bob Dylan Vol. 2 (Dylan)
  • The Married Bob Dylan (Planet Waves)
  • The Divorced Bob Dylan (Blood on the Tracks)
  • The Collaboratin’ Bob Dylan (Desire)
  • The Shrill Bob Dylan (Street Legal)
  • The Evangelical Bob Dylan (Slow Train Coming)
  • The Devotional Bob Dylan (Saved)
  • The Hymnal Bob Dylan (Shot of Love)
  • The Reggae Bob Dylan (Infidels)
  • The Downhill Bob Dylan (Empire Burlesque)
  • The Regrettable Bob Dylan (Knocked Out Loaded)
  • The Forgettable Bob Dylan (Down In The Groove)
  • The Revitalised Bob Dylan (Oh Mercy)
  • The Giddy Bob Dylan (Under the Red Sky)
  • The Musicological Bob Dylan (Good As I Been To You)
  • The Musicological Bob Dylan Vol. 2 (World Gone Wrong)
  • The Bleak Bob Dylan (Time Out Of Mind)
  • The Pre-War Bob Dylan (“Love and Theft”)
  • The Languid Bob Dylan (Modern Times)
  • The Cajun Bob Dylan (Together Through Life)
  • The Joyeux Bob Dylan (Christmas in the Heart)

___________________

I think that list of Samuel’s is pretty much spot-on but does anyone have any other suggestions?

Bob Dylan at Slane Castle, Dublin,1984 - photos by DC Cardwell

Bob Dylan at Slane Castle, Dublin,1984 – photos by DC Cardwell

DC’s been busy… new videos, benefit album, gigs etc!

Hi, DC here,It’s been a busy time for me!First of all, I’d like to invite you to help with raising money for the innocent victims of the war in Libya. I was asked to contribute a track to the MUSIC FOR LIBYA album, which is available HERE for only $9.99. All of the proceeds will got to purchasing food to send into Libya. More details at the site.

Secondly, if you’re in Melbourne, I’m playing at a benefit for the Christchurch earthquake on Saturday night (9th April 2011). It’s in Bayswater at Truth, Liberation & Concern, 265 Canterbury Rd, Bayswater (Melbourne). There are some other excellent artists on the bill.

[EDIT: here are some highlights of this gig, featuring me along with Adrian Austin, Marjorie Cardwell and our son Samuel.

Thirdly, I had a great gig at the Chandelier Room with Victor Stranges and the band and you can see a 15 min. video of that here:

Fourthly, many people voted in my Facebook poll, “What Song Would You Like Me To Cover?” and the top votes were for:

1. HARVEST MOON: 48 votes
2. BLACKBIRD: 37 votes
3. WATERLOO SUNSET: 32 votes

I already have a version of Blackbird on YouTube so I recorded myself singing Harvest Moon and Waterloo Sunset and posted them on my YouTube “Covers“.

Harvest Moon – Neil Young cover by DC Cardwell
Waterloo Sunset – Kinks Kover by DC Cardwell
Blackbird – Beatles cover by DC Cardwell

The Last Waltz

Samuel & I spent a pleasant evening changing guitar strings, eating the last of the Christmas cake and listening to the second commentary on The Band’s “The Last Waltz” DVD. Levon Helm & Garth Hudson are good value as always. Greil Marcus is so bursting with insight he’s slightly dangerous to himself and others. And the rest of the participants throw in a few interesting tidbits and Martin/Mr/Marty Scorsese impressions. Someone scorns Van Morrison‘s bizarre garb in a manner almost worthy of The Mighty Boosh. And Neil Diamond‘s apparel and general out-of-placeness is also accurately pinpointed. But above all, it’s worth waiting to the end where there’s a beautiful, wistful Garth Hudson solo piano piece. You don’t expect music on the commentary track!

BIG news from DC Cardwell [Newsletter 2nd Dec 2010]

DC Cardwell's Some Hope album with CD (200w)

Whew! It’s all happening!


(1) My album Some Hope has been re-released in the US on a small company named Gladyce out of Portland, Oregon. It’s newly repackaged in a beautiful gatefold LP-style cardboard sleeve with new artwork. Sixteen (true!) tracks of pure goodness. The CD is available from Bandcamp, CD Baby and my website (dccardwell.com)

Or you can find it on iTunes or Amazon. [EDIT: Also Spotify]


(2) Possibly even more exciting for me, next week I’m flying to Los Angeles to record some songs for a movie with ace producer/composer/musician Jaymee Carpenter (www.jaymeecarpenter.com).

Jaymee has a very impressive resumé which includes writing music for That 70’s Show and 3rd Rock From The Sun and the Paramount Pictures blockbuster The Fighter starring Mark Wahlberg, Christian Bale & Amy Adams.

“How did this come about?”, I hear you ask, not unreasonably. Well, just a couple of weeks ago a friend of mine sent a youtube link of my song ‘Birthday Present’ to someone else, who then sent it to Jaymee. He loved it, checked out the rest of the album, and contacted me to say he wanted to work with me for this movie project. Which just  goes to show how important it is to get your music out there and for your fans and friends to share it in every way possible!

DC & Victor play Ruby's Lounge, Nov 2010, with Samuel and Chris
DC & Victor, Ruby’s Lounge, Nov 2010, with Samuel on bass

(3) And finally… this coming Sunday, my friend and partner-in-crime Victor Stranges are showing off our new band at www.chandelierroom.com.au in Moorabbin (just south of Melbourne). The show’s at 4pm and it’s free entry to this really cool family-friendly venue! We’ve played there before and everyone agrees that it’s one of the best places around to play in. Really nice vibe, good stage and PA and a nice little bar/shop. It’s at:

Ruby's Lounge 20101117-Chris Haylock-203h
DC & Victor, Ruby’s Lounge, Nov 2010, Chris Haylock on drums

Review of Neil Young at the Sidney Myer Music Bowl, Melbourne, Australia, 28 Jan 2009

The Sidney Myer Music Bowl is a rather wonderful outdoor venue in the
heart of Melbourne’s King’s Domain. A natural amphitheatre with a large
stage and a covered area for those who can afford the expensive seats!
For once, I paid the extra to get up close to one of my major musical
heroes. I was accompanied by my wife Marjie and my son Samuel, both
also Neil Young fans.

But it was just too hot for me to really enjoy this show. I’ve been in
Melbourne for twelve years now, but for a Northern Ireland kid these
40+ days are hard to take, especially when they drag on for too long a
period! And after a long hot day and a scorching walk to the venue,
you’re not exactly in the mood to rock and roll all night long, free
world or not.

I regret that we stayed in our seats under the dome as it was indeed
like baking in an oven, but the heat was also making us feel so tired
that we were reluctant to move back to watch and listen from out in the
open air. I now wish we had, judging from other people’s comments.

I’m a long-time Neil fan (ever since I heard a track from the new album
Zuma in 1975 while listening to the John Peel Show on a little
transistor radio underneath my pillow) and his playing has influenced
me more than any other guitarist’s. Anyone who knows me will attest
that I am a huge Neil enthusiast.

And I’ve only seen him twice before – the last two and a half songs
(don’t ask!) of a show in Vancouver back in the early 90s and his last
appearance here in Melbourne on the Greendale tour, which was really
great but not a typical performance.

I’d read very good things about this tour, with the British leg being
hailed as his best since the famous Crazy Horse shows of the mid-70s.

So I was primed for this to be the “gig of a lifetime”, but it was not
to be – which was probably more due to the scorching weather, my
fragile physical state (for various reasons), poor sound from where I
was sitting, a guy to my left who was not large but somehow took up way
more space (mine) than was justified, and a song selection which was
not to my taste. So I’m surprised to be writing a
less-than-enthusiastic review and I apologise for it, because I think
most people there enjoyed it more than I did.

The Greendale show had been at the same venue, and from our vantage
point then, much further from the stage, the sound was perfect.
Tonight, down near the front, it was rather boxy and unfortunately the
drums were mixed way too loud and reverberant like any crappy bar band,
which was annoying most of the time, but especially in the ballads,
when it was completely ridiculous. I guess the covered part of the
venue (50 years old next month) was acoustically designed for classical
music, but that’s not good for rock’n’roll! And from where I was,
Neil’s acoustic guitar sounded really bad and that spoiled songs that
should have been good, like “The Needle And The Damage Done”.

I thought the backing vocals were spot-on and beautiful, especially
Neil’s wife Pegi‘s, and the playing was generally sympathetic, but I
couldn’t really hear the piano at all from where I was. And as for the
bass, it was pretty much impossible to clearly identify any particular
note, so we just got a general boominess in the lower registers.

Anyway, Neil was full of energy, which amazed me given the extreme
heat. He was wearing a white open-necked shirt and Eric Morecambe style
khaki Bermuda shorts. His voice was sounding fairly strong despite the
acoustics, however at the Greendale show five years ago his voice was
astoundingly good, in fact I didn’t even know he *could* sing like that!

And despite regretting not moving back, it was good to be close enough
to really *see* Neil and observe what he was doing with his guitar.

It was also a treat to see Ben Keith – someone who’s played with Neil
since those far-off legendary days of the early 70s. The full line-up
was Ben Keith (pedal steel, guitar, piano, organ), Rick Rosas (bass),
Chad Cromwell (drums), Anthony Crawford and Pegi Young (backing vocals,
piano and guitars).

An early song was a fave of mine, “Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere”
with its delectable la-la-las. But for my particular taste there were
just too many songs that I find mediocre, with throwaway tunes and
sophomoric homespun cod-religious or philosophical lyrics which are
probably crowd-pleasing but lack the depth of which he is capable. Many
of them had failed to interest me on the original albums and these live
performances didn’t enhance them any. I noticed that Marjie and Samuel
laughed heartily at some of them, and not in a good way!

An exception was “One Of These Days” which I had never liked much but
which suddenly rung very true on this occasion, and I guess it’s
moments like that which make a show worthwhile!

“Four Strong Winds” came across quite well too. The harmonium on
“Mother Earth” was nice, but, well, the song is laughable, really! I
mean, you’d think you can’t go wrong with the tune of “O Waly Waly“,
but the words… This was one which really had Marjie and Samuel
cracking up and who could blame them? (Flame away – we all have our
likes and dislikes and I’ve already stated that Neil is one of my absolute
fave artists so I don’t feel guilty!)

As others have commented online, “Cortez The Killer” was, well, killer,
and the only song of the night where he really let his guitar do what
it does so well – sing. (But you know, even though that song is one of
the best tracks on my favourite Neil album, the sentiment still really
bugs me because he suggests that sacrificing children is OK if you
think you’re going to get some mystical benefit from it. It doesn’t
exactly support his case against Cortez. There – I’ve written a song
about that, but now I’ve said it openly for the first time!)

For me, another highlight of the evening was “Words”. That was the only
song in which Neil played his white Gretsch and I hate to say this,
but it sounded way better than his legendary Les Paul, “Old Black”. I
think the cleaner, bitier sound helped make up for the muddiness of the
PA. I had never really loved this song on Harvest, but tonight the 11/8
time signatures (or whatever they are) sounded perfectly natural and
even swinging. Marjie hated it though!

The finale of “A Day In The Life” was brilliant. It’s a great song that
the Beatles made kinda difficult to cover (although I have a 45rpm
record of Wes Montgomery doing it) but it was good to hear it being
done so well by Neil. He and his band are as capable of doing
cacophonous wig-outs as anyone, as we all know, but they somehow
managed to make the orchestral crescendos sound remarkably like the Sgt
Pepper version! I was sure I could hear the swirling strings but it was
coming out of bass, drums, piano, organ and guitars. For the second
crescendo he proceeded to break all the strings on “Old Black” and thrash the
pickups with them, at great length and to noisy effect. The middle bit
(woke up, fell out of bed) was perhaps a little off, and Nil seemed to
be forgetting the words or forgetting to go up to the microphone, but
the overall effect was unforgettable.

Pegi had utilised the illuminated vibraphone in a pleasantly Motownish
way earlier in the evening, but for the climax of “A Day In The Life”
Neil ran up to where it was located at the back of the stage and hit a
percussive version of the Beatles’ famous piano chord. Not quite as
cute as the Rutles’ “plonk”, but a good way to end.

Review by DC Cardwell (www.dccardwell.com)

FULL SET LIST (thanks to http://www.setlist.fm)

1. Love And Only Love
2. Sea Change
3. Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere
4. I’ve Been Waiting For You
5. Spirit Road
6. Cortez The Killer
7. Cinnamon Girl
8. Mother Earth
9. The Needle And The Damage Done
10. Light A Candle
11. Four Strong Winds
12. Unknown Legend
13. One Of These Days
14. Get Back To The Country
15. Words
16. Just Singing A Song
17. Rockin’ In The Free World
18. A Day In The Life