Review of Marjorie’s album in Strutterzine

“Ireland-born, Australia-based singer Marjorie Cardwell’s In Another World was inspired by the diagnosis of a brain tumour in 2012 so, as you might expect, there are some pretty personal songs included. Fortunately, Marjorie’s sense of irony is firmly in place on an album of retro pop with a generally upbeat feel that’s life-affirming. Cardwell’s voice is the perfect vehicle for these classic 60s-influenced songs and is particularly effective on the bittersweet ‘Not On Your Own’.”

Strutterzine magazine, Jan 2013

 

Strutterzine-Marjorie Cardwell-In Another World-review 2013

Full page

Strutterzine-Marjorie Cardwell-In Another World-review 2013

Marjorie’s review

 

 

 

Noel Fielding, Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne, October 24, 2012 – review by Marjorie Cardwell

Marjorie Cardwell reviews a Melbourne show by Noel Fielding, AKA Vince Noir out of The Mighty Boosh

This is the first time Noel Fielding has been in Australia for nearly 10 years. Since then he has achieved widespread recognition for The Mighty Boosh, as well as his own TV show, “Luxury Comedy” and “Never Mind The Buzzcocks“. Marjorie appears in Noel’s book “The Scribblings of a Madcap Shambleton” in a photograph artistically defaced by Mr. Fielding himself (see below).

Noel Fielding was a revelation last night. Although I’m a big fan, I actually had no real expectations for his solo show, particularly since he had cancelled the night before due to a stomach upset.

I needn’t have worried – he was a delight! He was a pixie full of good humour and energy and it was obvious that he is in that class of performers who transcend the competent to the clearly inspired.

I laughed SO hard even at routines I’d seen before because they were expanded and fresh. The Fly and The Moth had me gaping in wonder and convulsed in laughter at the same time – it’s surprising I didn’t choke on a few flies myself. Monkey Edwards was a tour de force. His Australian special Joey Ramones and Moon were especially endearing and our own Botanic Gardens bats will forever be thought of as ‘fruit dogs’ now!

Noel Fielding is a charming, ageless, delightful, clever, generous, inspired and inherently hilarious creature with the strength and stamina of an ox. I hope Australia sees a lot more of him and he stays off the duck curries.

I could also describe it as a masterful performance, because it was. Very impressive indeed.

Marjorie Cardwell in The Scribblings of a Madcap Shambleton by Noel Fielding

~ Marjorie Cardwell

PS: If  you were also there, or at the Thursday show, we’d love to hear your thoughts!

DC makes “Best Of 2011” list!

The delightful Tamara Tillinghast of The Think Tank show on Mixx 96.1 KXXO in Olympia, WA played her “Best of 2011” today and I made the list! I was especially chuffed because most of the other artists on her list are very well-known and acclaimed artists, not just indie no-names like me, so it pretty cool to be in such esteemed company. 🙂 ~ DC

Jens Lekman – “A Promise”

The Red Button – “Caught in the Middle”

Fruit Bats – “Tony the Tripper”

Feist – “Bittersweet Melodies”

Drive-By Truckers – “Everybody Needs Love”

Emmylou Harris – “Home Sweet Home”

The Decemberists – “January Hymn”

Iron and Wine – “Me and Lazarus”

The Bees – “I Really Need Love”

Eleanor Friedberger – “Inn of the Seventh Ray”

Sondre Lerche – “Go Right Ahead”

Crooked Fingers – “Our New Favorite”

DC Cardwell – “Peace and Love”

Wilco – “Sunloathe”

Lucinda Williams – “Blessed”

David Lowery – “Raise ’em Up on Honey”

I’m From Barcelona – “Get in Line”

The Ladybug Transistor – “Breaking Up on the Beat”

Over the Rhine – “Days Like This”

Thao and Mirah – “Little Cups”

Alison Krauss & Union Station – “Dimming of the Day”

Neil Young International Harvesters – “Get Back to the Country”

Kerosene Halo – “And So it Goes”

They Might Be Giants – “Celebration”

Gillian Welch – “Silver Dagger”

Review of DC Cardwell’s “Some Hope” at Powerpopaholic

Many thanks to Aaron at Powerpopaholic for reviewing my album “Some Hope” – here are some choice extracts…

  • DC Cardwell creates a heart felt acoustic gem here, full of wonderful melodic hooks and a Ray Davies styled vocal. The gentle minor chords and harmonies that open “I Am Still The Same” are both brilliant and poignant.
  • “Birthday Present” is another example of solid composition and a revelatory Harrison styled guitar break.
  • Some of the  mid-tempo ballads (“The Quiet Ages”) are like magical combinations of both Paul Simon and McCartney.

Read the full review (and lots more great stuff) at http://www.powerpopaholic.com

Review of Neil Young at the Sidney Myer Music Bowl, Melbourne, Australia, 28 Jan 2009

The Sidney Myer Music Bowl is a rather wonderful outdoor venue in the
heart of Melbourne’s King’s Domain. A natural amphitheatre with a large
stage and a covered area for those who can afford the expensive seats!
For once, I paid the extra to get up close to one of my major musical
heroes. I was accompanied by my wife Marjie and my son Samuel, both
also Neil Young fans.

But it was just too hot for me to really enjoy this show. I’ve been in
Melbourne for twelve years now, but for a Northern Ireland kid these
40+ days are hard to take, especially when they drag on for too long a
period! And after a long hot day and a scorching walk to the venue,
you’re not exactly in the mood to rock and roll all night long, free
world or not.

I regret that we stayed in our seats under the dome as it was indeed
like baking in an oven, but the heat was also making us feel so tired
that we were reluctant to move back to watch and listen from out in the
open air. I now wish we had, judging from other people’s comments.

I’m a long-time Neil fan (ever since I heard a track from the new album
Zuma in 1975 while listening to the John Peel Show on a little
transistor radio underneath my pillow) and his playing has influenced
me more than any other guitarist’s. Anyone who knows me will attest
that I am a huge Neil enthusiast.

And I’ve only seen him twice before – the last two and a half songs
(don’t ask!) of a show in Vancouver back in the early 90s and his last
appearance here in Melbourne on the Greendale tour, which was really
great but not a typical performance.

I’d read very good things about this tour, with the British leg being
hailed as his best since the famous Crazy Horse shows of the mid-70s.

So I was primed for this to be the “gig of a lifetime”, but it was not
to be – which was probably more due to the scorching weather, my
fragile physical state (for various reasons), poor sound from where I
was sitting, a guy to my left who was not large but somehow took up way
more space (mine) than was justified, and a song selection which was
not to my taste. So I’m surprised to be writing a
less-than-enthusiastic review and I apologise for it, because I think
most people there enjoyed it more than I did.

The Greendale show had been at the same venue, and from our vantage
point then, much further from the stage, the sound was perfect.
Tonight, down near the front, it was rather boxy and unfortunately the
drums were mixed way too loud and reverberant like any crappy bar band,
which was annoying most of the time, but especially in the ballads,
when it was completely ridiculous. I guess the covered part of the
venue (50 years old next month) was acoustically designed for classical
music, but that’s not good for rock’n’roll! And from where I was,
Neil’s acoustic guitar sounded really bad and that spoiled songs that
should have been good, like “The Needle And The Damage Done”.

I thought the backing vocals were spot-on and beautiful, especially
Neil’s wife Pegi‘s, and the playing was generally sympathetic, but I
couldn’t really hear the piano at all from where I was. And as for the
bass, it was pretty much impossible to clearly identify any particular
note, so we just got a general boominess in the lower registers.

Anyway, Neil was full of energy, which amazed me given the extreme
heat. He was wearing a white open-necked shirt and Eric Morecambe style
khaki Bermuda shorts. His voice was sounding fairly strong despite the
acoustics, however at the Greendale show five years ago his voice was
astoundingly good, in fact I didn’t even know he *could* sing like that!

And despite regretting not moving back, it was good to be close enough
to really *see* Neil and observe what he was doing with his guitar.

It was also a treat to see Ben Keith – someone who’s played with Neil
since those far-off legendary days of the early 70s. The full line-up
was Ben Keith (pedal steel, guitar, piano, organ), Rick Rosas (bass),
Chad Cromwell (drums), Anthony Crawford and Pegi Young (backing vocals,
piano and guitars).

An early song was a fave of mine, “Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere”
with its delectable la-la-las. But for my particular taste there were
just too many songs that I find mediocre, with throwaway tunes and
sophomoric homespun cod-religious or philosophical lyrics which are
probably crowd-pleasing but lack the depth of which he is capable. Many
of them had failed to interest me on the original albums and these live
performances didn’t enhance them any. I noticed that Marjie and Samuel
laughed heartily at some of them, and not in a good way!

An exception was “One Of These Days” which I had never liked much but
which suddenly rung very true on this occasion, and I guess it’s
moments like that which make a show worthwhile!

“Four Strong Winds” came across quite well too. The harmonium on
“Mother Earth” was nice, but, well, the song is laughable, really! I
mean, you’d think you can’t go wrong with the tune of “O Waly Waly“,
but the words… This was one which really had Marjie and Samuel
cracking up and who could blame them? (Flame away – we all have our
likes and dislikes and I’ve already stated that Neil is one of my absolute
fave artists so I don’t feel guilty!)

As others have commented online, “Cortez The Killer” was, well, killer,
and the only song of the night where he really let his guitar do what
it does so well – sing. (But you know, even though that song is one of
the best tracks on my favourite Neil album, the sentiment still really
bugs me because he suggests that sacrificing children is OK if you
think you’re going to get some mystical benefit from it. It doesn’t
exactly support his case against Cortez. There – I’ve written a song
about that, but now I’ve said it openly for the first time!)

For me, another highlight of the evening was “Words”. That was the only
song in which Neil played his white Gretsch and I hate to say this,
but it sounded way better than his legendary Les Paul, “Old Black”. I
think the cleaner, bitier sound helped make up for the muddiness of the
PA. I had never really loved this song on Harvest, but tonight the 11/8
time signatures (or whatever they are) sounded perfectly natural and
even swinging. Marjie hated it though!

The finale of “A Day In The Life” was brilliant. It’s a great song that
the Beatles made kinda difficult to cover (although I have a 45rpm
record of Wes Montgomery doing it) but it was good to hear it being
done so well by Neil. He and his band are as capable of doing
cacophonous wig-outs as anyone, as we all know, but they somehow
managed to make the orchestral crescendos sound remarkably like the Sgt
Pepper version! I was sure I could hear the swirling strings but it was
coming out of bass, drums, piano, organ and guitars. For the second
crescendo he proceeded to break all the strings on “Old Black” and thrash the
pickups with them, at great length and to noisy effect. The middle bit
(woke up, fell out of bed) was perhaps a little off, and Nil seemed to
be forgetting the words or forgetting to go up to the microphone, but
the overall effect was unforgettable.

Pegi had utilised the illuminated vibraphone in a pleasantly Motownish
way earlier in the evening, but for the climax of “A Day In The Life”
Neil ran up to where it was located at the back of the stage and hit a
percussive version of the Beatles’ famous piano chord. Not quite as
cute as the Rutles’ “plonk”, but a good way to end.

Review by DC Cardwell (www.dccardwell.com)

FULL SET LIST (thanks to http://www.setlist.fm)

1. Love And Only Love
2. Sea Change
3. Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere
4. I’ve Been Waiting For You
5. Spirit Road
6. Cortez The Killer
7. Cinnamon Girl
8. Mother Earth
9. The Needle And The Damage Done
10. Light A Candle
11. Four Strong Winds
12. Unknown Legend
13. One Of These Days
14. Get Back To The Country
15. Words
16. Just Singing A Song
17. Rockin’ In The Free World
18. A Day In The Life